WHY MUIRURI MIGHT GO FREE

Students who live away from school know Muiruri all too well. In most cases, some of his infamous antics usually leave at least one student stranded on their way to school in the morning. It’s no wonder most students, especially those in my area of residence, do not like dealing with him. I have heard on different occasion students wonder out loud why he never gets transferred to some other department where he never has to deal with students. For example, driving the school pickups or being assigned as a personal chauffer to one of the high ranking administrators, you know the ones important enough to warrant being driven in the back seat. One student had humorously suggested that he be given the university tractor, anything to get him away from people. I have to say that in my own opinion, he has the poorest people skills I have seen in anyone all my life. It came as no surprise when his bus caused the most horrible accident to ever happen within Dedan Kimathi University of Technology.
Someone ended up dead, and the students were crying out for more blood, Muiruri’s blood. But he was lucky to get away without a scratch. At least none I could see. That’s all well and good; I am not a proponent of mob justice. That’s not because I do not recognize the urgency with which some justice needs to be dispensed, but because if we all go around bending the law whenever it suits us, this nation will soon degenerate into anarchy. I fully share the sentiments of the students, but it is better this way – let the due process of the law prevail. Hopefully, justice will be found for both sides.
The legal process is an intricate one, and only a lawyer can predict the course of the quest for truth and justice. But we know the truth, that is, the accident involved the bus being driven by Muiruri. But it remains to be proven in a court of law if he was reckless or negligent. In either of these cases, he would be responsible for the death. However, he was acting on behalf of Dedan Kimathi University of Technology, which, I think, makes the institution liable to compensate the parents if a judge rules to the same effect. However, do not be surprised if this matter never gets to a court of law. There are two main reasons why it may not, and they are also the reasons why Muiruri may be back with us soon.
First, Muiruri is well protected. I am not talking about the popular allegation that there are higher powers watching out for him. I mean that the university will do a fine job of defending him. If he is found guilty of any wrongdoing on his part, the university might have to pay up. The amounts involved in a case like this can run up to tens or hundreds of millions. This is because, despite the possibility of punitive damages being negligible, a good lawyer can still prove that the real damages, in terms of future earning potential and so on, are huge. I doubt that the university has any kind of money set aside for litigations or settlements of such magnitude. That’s why they will do their best to avoid a conviction for Muiruri or themselves, should the parents be inclined to sue the university.
Second, we all know the stories about big fishes and small fishes. The outcome of it all will largely depend on the social and financial standing of the parents. Their social position will influence the kind of information they have access to. How exposed are they? Their financial position will influence the quality of help they can get for themselves. Trust me, if this thing goes to trial, they will need help, legal and otherwise. In this world, being the smallest fish in the pond is never good for anyone. Sooner or later, a bigger fish swallows the small fish; it’s nothing personal, he has to eat. In a similar manner, the university will go to great lengths to protect its reputation. The question here is whether the parents will have the resources to go an equal distance in seeking justice for their deceased son. If not, we can perhaps start looking forward to seeing Muiruri pretty soon. Personally, I never want to be driven by him again, that would only trigger sad memories. And I don’t think I am the only one, I know at least one other person who is traumatized by what happened to Morris.
The new traffic rules have a clause somewhere stating something to the effect that causing the death of another person because of recklessness amounts to murder. There have been so many legal and constitutional changes happening in Kenya recently that I am not even sure what the penalty for murder is anymore. It used to be death sentence, but it was changed to life imprisonment. I don’t know what the sentence is when the murder was not premeditated, or there are mitigating circumstances, etc. If Muiruri is found guilty under that act, he may be imprisoned. Otherwise, he might only lose his job and walk away a free man. Or maybe he is the luckiest man alive, in which case he’ll have his job back, or suffer the minor inconvenience of a transfer to another institution. All these are possibilities we should be ready for, because so long as the case is left to the courts, the gavel has the final say. But I am only an engineering student not a lawyer, and these outcomes are only hypothetical. Also, we should wait to hear the results of the postmortem, there might be yet another twist. There are so many variables such that we cannot say for sure what will happen; so let’s just stick together, and, in honoring the memory of our comrade, not let the truth be buried or corrupted by anyone who might have such ill motives.

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3 thoughts on “WHY MUIRURI MIGHT GO FREE”

  1. If it happens by any chance , that muiruri returns back ! !! even him wil b killed ! let him not be seen around kimathi area !!!!!

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